Types of Professional Truck Driving Jobs

Types of Professional Truck Driving Jobs

New truck drivers have many options after going to truck driving school to get their CDL.  Getting your CDL is a huge accomplishment so it is important to make sure you are happy with the career path you choose after this journey. The foremost question that truck drivers must ask themselves is what kind of truck driver they want to be. The main two types of trucking jobs one must decipher between is whether to be a long haul truck driver or a regional or city truck driver. Long haul truckers, or over the road drivers, drive through many states across the country during their hauls. An average amount of mileage per year for this type of truck driver can be around 105,000 miles a year.  In comparison, a regional type truck driver hauls their loads around one particular area or city.  Because of this, a regional truck driver covers a lot less ground than a long haul trucker. Regional truck drivers can average 48,000 miles a year driving in their specific region.

 

Another decision that many truck drivers face is whether or not to buy or lease their own personal truck for their haul jobs.  Though this may be a dream or goal for many truck drivers, it is important to note that owning your own truck is not a necessity. The carrier that you choose to work for will usually provide tractor-trailers needed for jobs. The carrier also will keep up with the maintenance necessary to make sure the truck is working in top condition for their truck drivers.

 

One of the main factors truckers will consider when deciding which way to go for their career is how much money they will make. Earnings always differ in each truck driving position. Over the road truck drivers are typically paid per mile or a specific percentage of the amount of money the carrier makes for the load that was hauled by the truck driver.  A regional truck driver is typically paid for their hauls with an hourly rate. Either way, being a long haul driver or a regional driver is a career than can earn you great pay in the long run.

 

Below is a chart to show you the different types of professional truck driving jobs.  Each professional truck-driving job has positive aspects that will meet the personal requirements you have for the job you want. It is worth noting that Truck Driver Institute offers job placement services to all of our truck driving school students before, during and after graduation. Truck driving jobs are currently plentiful in the U.S. if you have the training and experience to qualify for them.  TDI can provide you with the knowledge necessary to get your CDL and become a knowledgeable truck driver.

 

Long Haul/Over the Road Truck Drivers Regional/City Truck Drivers Specialized Truck Drivers Owner-Operator Truck Drivers Hazardous Materials Truck Drivers
Usually drives long distance routes across the country Drives shorter routes within a region or city Can drive long distances across the country or shorter routes Can drive long distances across the country or shorter routes Can drive long distances across the country or shorter routes
Drive heavy trucks and drive for long periods of time Drive light, medium, or heavy trucks for shorter periods of time Drive trucks with sensitive or oversized load trucks Owns their own truck, and drives this truck to haul under contract for carriers Drive trucks containing hazardous materials—because of this the driver usually needs additional training and permits
Some people like to drive in teams (i.e. husband and wife teams) because of the length and distance of hauls Usually makes multiple stops per day because the driver is driving locally With some specialized trucking jobs, an extra permit might be required Many owner-operators start out as using a carrier’s truck so they can learn the ropes before buying their own truck When getting your CDL in truck driving school you must take a special test